06Mar

The Queen Dowager, Part 2

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Edward VI -

Catherine Parr, who was loved by the late king, had been well provided for in Henry’s will. She received an annual stipend, her own property, and even access to the crown jewels until the time King Edward should marry. After Henry’s death, she set up residence at Chester House where she became guardian for girls of noble birth, including her stepdaughter the Princess Elizabeth and Lady Jane Gray. At Chester House, the girls found a refuge of kindness and encouragement where they were able to pursue their formal educations, practice their Reformist religion and prepare for life at court.

A portrait of Sir Thomas Seymour by aritst Nicholas Denizot. Seymour was sent away from court on a diplomatic post during Henry VIII's reign. This was mostly so the old king could pursue Catherine Parr, Seymour's love interest. Parr would become Henry's sixth and final wife. Still, Henry provided for Seymour in his will, raising him to the peerage. Seymour was given the title Lord High Admiral, but was left off the ruling council for his nephew, King Edward VI.

 

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27Jan

Long Live the King

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Edward VI -

December 28, 1547, King Henry VIII of England died, leaving his son Edward to take his place. But Edward was still a boy and let's face it...those were big shoes to fill. Henry knew it.  Instead of naming one regent to guide his son until maturity, he named a whole council. His goal was to create a balanced council full of both conservative and progressive voices to help advise his son. But that's not how it worked out.

A portrait of Edward VI by William Scrots. Done around 1550. 

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