19Sep

Let's Talk Pirate

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Elizabeth I -

It's International Talk Like a Pirate Day. So let's talk about pirates. Specifically, let's talk about Francis Drake, Queen Elizabeth I's favorite English pirate, or as she called him, Sir.

Sir Francis Drake, National Portrait Gallery, London

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07May

Losing Their Religion

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Elizabeth I -

For over thirty years England had been in the throws of a religious reformation. One king told them to do this, another told them to do that. The English weren't sure what they believed anymore--or if it was legal under the current monarch. This was the maelstrom into which Elizabeth I stepped on day one of her ascension. And she tackled the subject head on.

Elizabeth I was a busy, busy queen even before she was officially coronated in 1559. She had to be. With a court and church packed with Mary’s loyalists, Elizabeth had to diplomatically create a government that would do what she wanted and a church that would officially recognize her. No easy task.

In that first year, Elizabeth fired most of her bishops, appointed a new Archbishop of Canterbury, summoned parliament, and then proceeded to pass the Act of Supremacy, the Religious Settlement, and the Act of Uniformity.

Elizabeth's coronation portrait. Part of a private collection, this portrait is now housed at the National Portrait Gallery in London. The artist is unknown, but this portrait was done around Elizabeth's death, based on an earlier portrait which had been destroyed in a fire. Elizabeth was 25 years old when she became queen of England.

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24Mar

The Queen is Dead! Long Live the King!

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Elizabeth I -

England and Scotland had been fighting over border issues and territorial claims for centuries, at the cost of hundreds of thousands of lives and countless financial losses. All these dead couldn’t bring peace between the two bordering countries. In the end, it only took one death, the death of a Queen, to unite them.

Queen Elizabeth I died March 24, 1603. It marked the end of the Tudor Era, and the beginning of the Stuart Dynasty.

Elizabeth I shown near the end of her reign. Portrait by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. It is located at the Folgers Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC.

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11Feb

Murder!

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Elizabeth I -

On February 10th, 1567 Lord Darnley, husband of Mary, Queen of Scotts was murdered. Guess who the chief suspect was?

 

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04Sep

The Pressures of Beauty

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Elizabeth I -

The pressures of beauty!

We think we got it bad when it comes to societal pressures of beauty. The 16th century was no different. As pointed out in this article by Jonathan Jones, first featured in The Guardian, extreme lengths were taken by noble renaissance women to make sure they looked good in their official portraits. They paid the artists…and portrait artists operated under a strict code of professional courtesy when portraying their wealthy patrons. 

One, however, escaped the censors.

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15Jul

The Spanish Armada Sets Sail

Posted by on 4 January 2012 in category in Elizabeth I -

The Spanish are coming! The Spanish are coming!  On July 12, 1588, the Spanish Armada set sail in hopes of defeating the English fleet and thereby ending the reigh of Elizabeth I. This feud had been simmering a long time, and it was about to come to an end....just not the one Phillip of Spain was hoping for.

 

Watch Cate Blanchett's performance as Elizabeth I, giving her speach to the troops at Tilbury.

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29Jan

Robert Deveroux, The Earl of Essex

Posted by on 4 January 2012 in category in Elizabeth I -

The Earl of Essex was the stepson of Robert Dudley, the son of Dudley’s third wife, Lettice Knollys. Lettice was the granddaughter of Mary Boleyn and thereby Elizabeth’s cousin. The Earl of Essex came to court at the age of 18 with his stepfather Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester. Showing a thirst for military glory, he distinguished himself as a soldier in the Low Countries War while serving with Leicester.

 

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29Jan

All the Queen’s Men

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Elizabeth I -

In October of 1562, while on progress through the country, Queen Elizabeth fell ill with smallpox, a common plague in 16th century England. She recovered, but her advisors thought she wouldn’t. While on her deathbed, William Cecil and her council created their own plan for succession. They never got to implement it, but when Elizabeth recovered, she faced renewed pressure to marry and produce an heir for England.

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14Jun

The Virgin Queen

Posted by on 4 January 2012 in category in Elizabeth I -

Elizabeth I always had an instinct for image and public relations. Throughout her reign she took an active role in carefully constructing her public image. Her father had used fear and intimidation to rule his subjects. Her sister Mary had preferred royal edicts and inquisition tactics to cajoling an unhappy populace. But Elizabeth wanted to be loved. And she understood the need for public presentation of both her image and her ideas. 

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