15Apr

Long Live the Queen...The Other Queen.

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Henry VIII -

1553 was a big year for Henry VIII's court, and this week was especially busy. He officially deposed of one queen, and quickly declared another. It's good to be king.

 

Portraits of Henry VIII and his second wife, Anne Boleyn

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23Mar

Henry's Act of Succession 1, 2 & 3

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Henry VIII -

Henry VIII didn't have any trouble letting people know what he was thinking. Unfortunately, he was constantly changing his mind. When it came to his succession, it took him three times to get it right.

His First Act of Succession was passed by Parliament on this day in 1534.

 

The Succession Portrait by Hans Holbein shows Henry seated with his heir Edward and Edward's mother Jane Seymour (painted posthumously). Mary is shown standing on the left side of the portrait, and Elizabeth on the right.

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18Feb

Is This Anne Boleyn?

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Henry VIII -

Using face recognition software, scientists may have identified a portrait of Anne Boleyn. Art historians have long debated whether the portrait is of Anne or of Henry VIII's third wife, Jane Seymour. Because most portraits of Anne were destroyed after her beheading and fall from grace, there remains only one positiviely confirmed depiction of Boleyn, and it is a crude rendering on what is called the Moost Happi medal. But is science about to change all that?

The Nidd Hall Portrait currently held at the Bradford Art Galleries and Museums in the UK.

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11Dec

Who Wants to Sleep in Henry VIII's Bed?

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Henry VIII -

Most of us would give a definitive "Not me!" to that question, but Anne of Cleves, Henry VIII's fourth wife, never had much of a choice. She was pressured into the marriage by her family, only to arrive in England to be famously rejected by her husband. But before everything went bad (as in before they met) Henry had commissioned a marriage bed headboard for his wedding night.

 

Part of the Burrell Collection in Glasgow, the headboard from Henry VIII's and Anne of Cleves marriage bed is traveling to London for Christmas where it will be shown at the New Bond Street Bonham's location.

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07Mar

The Queen Dowager, Part 3

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Henry VIII -

Before Sir Thomas Seymour proposed to Catherine Parr, he had secretly proposed to both Lady Mary and Lady Elizabeth, both heirs to the throne. When they turned him down (which of course they would…marrying without the council’s approval was treason and they certainly wouldn’t have gotten approval), he simply moved on to Plan B. Catherine Parr was stepmother to the king. She was beloved by all the royal heirs and certainly still held some influence at court. She was the third most powerful woman in the country and that was good enough for him—or as good as he was going to get.

A portrait of Catherine Parr attributed to the artist William Scrots. It now hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in London.

Catherine Parr was the sixth wife of Henry VIII, whom she survived. After his death, she married her old flame, Sir Thomas Seymour, brother of Jane Seymour and uncle to the king. Catherine died after giving birth to the couple's daughter, Mary.

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03Mar

The Queen Dowager, Part 1

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Henry VIII -

In 1543 Catherine Parr was chosen to be Henry VIII’s sixth wife. Catherine Parr was twice widowed and courting another man when the king came calling. The other man was Thomas Seymour, and Henry had him sent away to a permanent ambassadorship, clearing the way for his own courtship. Knowing she had little choice in the matter, Catherine accepted the king’s proposal for marriage. While undoubtedly knowing full well the risks of being Henry VIII’s wife, Catherine Parr never publicly or privately expressed doubt, fear, or resistance to being queen. She knew her duty, and rose to the occasion. 

Catherine Parr as a young woman in this portrait by an unknown artist. She was already twice widowed when she married Henry VIII. Catherine came from a noble family who's own father died when she was young. She had been raised by her mother, a strong and determined woman who trained Catherine to manage a noble household. With the exception of a few conservative Catholic bishops, Catherine was well loved and respected as queen.

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14Feb

Vain. Vacuous. Vamp.

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Henry VIII -

Poor Katherine Howard. Contemporary historians were very harsh, calling her all of the above and more. But they had nothing on her husband, Henry VIII, who had the poor girl executed, all because he was a sickly, impotent old man--oh, and that bit about her having an affair. She was executed on February 13, 1542. Happy Valentine's Day indeed.

Catherine Howard miniture painted by Hans Holbein the Younger

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23Jan

We Now Pronounce You...

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Henry VIII -

Happy Anniversary to Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. They were married January 25, 1533 at Whitehall Palace in London.

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16Dec

Happy Birthday Catherine of Aragon

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Henry VIII -

Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII, was born this day in 1485. In spite of being the wife displaced by Anne Boleyn, Catherine of Aragon has her own notable place in history.

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30Sep

The Chapel Royal at St. James Palace

Posted by by Janet Dooley on 4 January 2012 in category in Henry VIII -

From Henry VIII and now to Prince George of Cambridge, the Chapel Royal at St. James Palace has seen plenty of royal drama in its nearly 500 year existence. Royal Historian Carolyn Harris fills us in with her insightful blog on the Palace's impressive history.

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